Look Closely

All of them
have walked through fire

fishcustardandthecumberbeast:

laurensmanlyscreams:

Just a reminder to the world that there is this glorious feminist thing called the Hawkeye Initiative. Where people draw Hawkeye (and possibly other avengers) in various sexual poses that comic artists generally depict women in.

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thehawkeyeinitiative
the greatest thing in the universe.

(via shutupandthinkofmydick)

tj:

This is a picture of three people from the Ferguson city commission.
Remember the story of how Ferguson police beat a man and then charged him with bleeding on their uniforms?
See that woman in the picture?
She was one of the cops who beat him.
Seriously what the fuck.
If you weren’t following #Ferguson on Twitter last night, you missed out. The city commission had a meeting where they tried to tell the people they couldn’t talk, but were eventually shouted down. So the All-White-Except-One city council sat there, gave people three minutes to speak, and said nothing, responded to nothing, and did nothing.
A couple of highlights:

A man arrested for peacefully protesting spoke up and said “I’ve done more jail time than Darren Wilson.”


“If Darren Wilson doesn’t get justice, you might as well bring back the army, because it’s going to be chaos,” said another.


ESPN E60 reportedly had a story about a football player from Ferguson who reported a harassment incident with Darren Wilson a week before Mike Brown. (Looked for more reports of this today and don’t see any. Sent a few messages to journalists who were covering Ferguson.)


Several people talked about how the “justice” system (more like “jüstice” system) in Ferguson routinely harasses and exploits people.


The whole thing seemed very organized, with people telling the council (paraphrased): “You’ve done nothing for us, and that’s why you’ve got a murder on your hands. Now we’re coming for you [meaning the various seats on the council]” with one woman in particular saying to the woman pictured above, “We’re coming for your seat first.”


This:



“I have 3 minutes to tell you I am ashamed of every single one of you.”

Source
Source

tj:

This is a picture of three people from the Ferguson city commission.

Remember the story of how Ferguson police beat a man and then charged him with bleeding on their uniforms?

See that woman in the picture?

She was one of the cops who beat him.

Seriously what the fuck.

If you weren’t following #Ferguson on Twitter last night, you missed out. The city commission had a meeting where they tried to tell the people they couldn’t talk, but were eventually shouted down. So the All-White-Except-One city council sat there, gave people three minutes to speak, and said nothing, responded to nothing, and did nothing.

A couple of highlights:

  1. A man arrested for peacefully protesting spoke up and said “I’ve done more jail time than Darren Wilson.”

  2. “If Darren Wilson doesn’t get justice, you might as well bring back the army, because it’s going to be chaos,” said another.

  3. ESPN E60 reportedly had a story about a football player from Ferguson who reported a harassment incident with Darren Wilson a week before Mike Brown. (Looked for more reports of this today and don’t see any. Sent a few messages to journalists who were covering Ferguson.)

  4. Several people talked about how the “justice” system (more like “jüstice” system) in Ferguson routinely harasses and exploits people.

  5. The whole thing seemed very organized, with people telling the council (paraphrased): “You’ve done nothing for us, and that’s why you’ve got a murder on your hands. Now we’re coming for you [meaning the various seats on the council]” with one woman in particular saying to the woman pictured above, “We’re coming for your seat first.”

  6. This:

“I have 3 minutes to tell you I am ashamed of every single one of you.”

Source

Source

(via steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep)

addicted2daydreaming:

A beautiful picture by Leontine Greenberg of a Skeksis from the Dark Crystal

addicted2daydreaming:

A beautiful picture by Leontine Greenberg of a Skeksis from the Dark Crystal

(via swampseer)

Victorian humour, kittens. Gotta love it.

Victorian humour, kittens. Gotta love it.

(Source: firewords-worth, via bluecohosh)

starklyinaccurate:

Value transgender women:

not just famous ones

or those who are conventionally pretty

or women who are successful

value ALL transgender women

shy women, short women, tall women, girls who no one knows, girls with low self-esteems, activists, gamers, disabled, neuroatypical women, young girls who haven’t yet started physically transitioning or even women who don’t plan or can’t afford to, women who you don’t get along with or those who you call friends or a stranger you just met

VALUE

SUPPORT

APPRECIATE

PRIORITIZE

TRANSGENDER

WOMEN

(via gtfothinspo)

freelgbtqpia:


In this chronicle of political awakening and queer solidarity, the activist and novelist Sarah Schulman describes her dawning consciousness of the Palestinian liberation struggle. Invited to Israel to give the keynote address at an LGBT studies conference at Tel Aviv University, Schulman declines, joining other artists and academics honoring the Palestinian call for an academic and cultural boycott of Israel. Anti-occupation activists in the United States, Canada, Israel, and Palestine come together to help organize an alternative solidarity visit for the American activist. Schulman takes us to an anarchist, vegan café in Tel Aviv, where she meets anti-occupation queer Israelis, and through border checkpoints into the West Bank, where queer Palestinian activists welcome her into their spaces for conversations that will change the course of her life. She describes the dusty roads through the West Bank, where Palestinians are cut off from water and subjected to endless restrictions while Israeli settler neighborhoods have full freedoms and resources.As Schulman learns more, she questions the contradiction between Israel’s investment in presenting itself as gay friendly—financially sponsoring gay film festivals and parades—and its denial of the rights of Palestinians. At the same time, she talks with straight Palestinian activists about their position in relation to homosexuality and gay rights in Palestine and internationally. Back in the United States, Schulman draws on her extensive activist experience to organize a speaking tour for some of the Palestinian queer leaders whom she had met and trusted. Dubbed “Al-Tour,” it takes the activists to LGBT community centers, conferences, and universities throughout the United States. Its success solidifies her commitment to working to end Israel’s occupation of Palestine, and it kindles her larger hope that a new “queer international” will emerge and join other movements demanding human rights across the globe.

[PDF]

freelgbtqpia:

In this chronicle of political awakening and queer solidarity, the activist and novelist Sarah Schulman describes her dawning consciousness of the Palestinian liberation struggle. Invited to Israel to give the keynote address at an LGBT studies conference at Tel Aviv University, Schulman declines, joining other artists and academics honoring the Palestinian call for an academic and cultural boycott of Israel. Anti-occupation activists in the United States, Canada, Israel, and Palestine come together to help organize an alternative solidarity visit for the American activist. Schulman takes us to an anarchist, vegan café in Tel Aviv, where she meets anti-occupation queer Israelis, and through border checkpoints into the West Bank, where queer Palestinian activists welcome her into their spaces for conversations that will change the course of her life. She describes the dusty roads through the West Bank, where Palestinians are cut off from water and subjected to endless restrictions while Israeli settler neighborhoods have full freedoms and resources.

As Schulman learns more, she questions the contradiction between Israel’s investment in presenting itself as gay friendly—financially sponsoring gay film festivals and parades—and its denial of the rights of Palestinians. At the same time, she talks with straight Palestinian activists about their position in relation to homosexuality and gay rights in Palestine and internationally. Back in the United States, Schulman draws on her extensive activist experience to organize a speaking tour for some of the Palestinian queer leaders whom she had met and trusted. Dubbed “Al-Tour,” it takes the activists to LGBT community centers, conferences, and universities throughout the United States. Its success solidifies her commitment to working to end Israel’s occupation of Palestine, and it kindles her larger hope that a new “queer international” will emerge and join other movements demanding human rights across the globe.

[PDF]

If I had to write a Literary Analysis 101 paper on [Once Upon a Time], I’d go crazy with all the queer theory I could infer from this tangled mess of a show. But the thing is that you and I both know that my gay feminist reading is not at all the intention of its creators and that what’s actually happening on the screen is a lot less friendly to an LGBTQ audience.

The thing is, representation matters, and one of the worst things that this kind of narrative does is that it expects an LGBTQ audience to be satisfied with the bare minimum. When this bare minimum is not met with automatic praise and thanks, the audience is punished in any number of ways, from a producer’s social media snarkery to claims by the mainstream media that the darned homosexuals just aren’t grateful enough. Even the smallest amount of negative reaction is cited as reason enough to not bother with such a storyline in the future.

—   

"And They Lived Heterosexually Ever After: Why I’m Not Recapping Once Upon A Time Anymore” on AutoStraddle (x)

I used several quotes from this essay in the Homoerotic Subtext panel and it is FABULOUS even if you don’t care at all about Once Upon A Time.  

(via bisexual-books)

(Source: justplainsomething, via freelgbtqpia)

“I gave a speech on bisexual health at a medical association conference a few years ago. One of the attendees, who is a mental health professional — he’s a therapist — wasn’t at my talk, but when he heard the topic of my speech, he told me, "Oh, when I have clients who say they’re bi, I really question it. I really make them talk it through, and we examine it very closely."

I said, "What if they say they’re gay?" He was gay, by the way.

He said, "Oh, in that case, we just talk about whatever they came to me for."

—   

Amy Andre in Nothing About Us Without Us from her speech on problems of Physical Health in the Bisexual Community, at a bisexual roundtable on 23 September 2013 in Washington DC USA (via bialogue-group)

It’s this shit right here that gets me so fucking mad at people who trivialise biphobia and monosexism by saying shit like “oh the worst you get is people thinking you are confused and greedy”, as if those stereotypes has no real consequences for bisexuals.

This is a fucking therapist, a man in charge of helping people overcome mental health issues and trauma, admitting freely that he and his colleagues treat bisexuality as if it is a mental health problem and a symptom of mental disturbance to be treated and cured.

He is telling a bisexual woman that he doesn’t treat gay people the same way and I’m pretty sure that he doesn’t treat straight folks that way, he is singling out bisexuals because he thinks there is something wrong with us identifying that way, because we are, in his mind, confused.

It makes me sick to think that he is making clients doubt and dissect their own sexuality, blamed their bisexuality for their mental state, told them that bisexuality was a symptom or something to take centre-stage over everything because he thinks it’s not as natural or mentally healthy as monosexuality.

This attitude towards bisexuality is endemic to the medical health industry, especially mental health, which is already a problematic field given how much stigma is attached to mental illness.

So many times I hear bisexuals express their anger at being told by qualified therapists and doctors that they were confused, greedy and/or unstable and therefore had to jump through pointless hoops, longer and more invasive therapy sessions, or even worse, threatened with having treatment withheld or taken in a direction completely different from monosexuals because “it’s all in their heads” or “just doing it for attention”. All because the person in charge believes all the shitty stereotypes that seem ever so trivial and not worth combating to biphobia-deniers.

And people wonder why bisexuals don’t come out to health professionals? They wonder why we don’t come out at all? They wonder why bisexuals have a rate of suicide and poor health way above straight and gay people?

Don’t ever tell me that is trivial. Bisexuals die because of these stereotypes, they are killed by these so-called mental health professionals telling them that they need to be cured by denying themselves and are erased after death by monosexism. Fuck everyone who doesn’t think that’s worth caring about.

(via a-little-bi-furious)

This is why it is so important to make sure that your therapist is actually bi-competant, or at least bi-friendly. If you cannot find a therapist near you on the Bisexuality-Aware Professional’s Directory, the questions on the list are good ones to ask any therapist who claims to be able to treat bisexuals. 

(via a-little-bi-furious)

(via freelgbtqpia)